3 Bold and Brilliant Art Exhibits to Visit in Chicago This Winter

By Thomas Connors | January 11, 2018 | Culture

Ditch the winter drearies with these three bold, brilliant art exhibitions.

Museum of Contemporary Art

Art-Exhibits-2.jpg

“Five Apples” (2015), Paul Heyer.

Fresh from marking its 50th anniversary, the Museum of Contemporary Art (220 E. Chicago Ave., 312.280.2660, mcachicago.org) continues its incisive programming, showcasing the work of Chicagoan Paul Heyer Jan. 16 to July 1. “I truly believe he is the greatest young painter living in Chicago,” says curator Omar Kholeif. “One of the things that most excites about his work is he’s dealing with gender, sexuality and body image, with strong references to art history, figures such as El Greco. This exhibition—all new work—is going to be very cinegraphic, very immersive, very much a place people want to spend time in.”

Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art

Art-Exhibits-3.jpg

Stephen Warde Anderson’s “The Jinni” (1995).

Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art (756 N. Milwaukee Ave., 312.243.9088, art.org) always looks beyond the usual, cruising far from the mainstream to explore myriad manifestations of creativity and championing the work of such singular artists as Lee Godie, Mr. Imagination and William Dawson. Self-taught Stephen Warde Anderson (whose work is in the collections of the American Folk Art Museum and The Smithsonian American Art Museum, among others) takes center stage from Jan. 26 to May 13. A Rockford resident, Anderson draws from movies, history and literature in his brightly hued images, paintings that depict old film stars, motifs from the Bible, and perhaps most remarkably, aliens and imaginary planets.

Vertical Gallery

Art-Exhibits-1.jpg

“It’s Nobody’s Fault” (2017), My Dog Sighs.

Vertical Gallery (1016 N. Western Ave., 773.697.3846, verticalgallery.com)—the Ukrainian Village venue for street art from all over—welcomes rising star My Dog Sighs Feb. 2 to 24. More than a muralist, the U.K.-based artist often uses found material, such as discarded tin cans, to form figurative pieces whose curious presence calls up questions of waste and abandonment.



Tags:

Photography by: HEYER PHOTO BY ROBERT HEISHMAN, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CHAPTER NY;
ANDERSON IMAGE COURTESY OF PRIVATE COLLECTION